Tag Archives: Windows

Get Ready for Windows 10: Learning Universal Windows App Development

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Windows 10 is coming this summer! It’s even already available in preview today. With it comes a huge opportunity for developers to build apps once for the Universal Windows Platform and deploy/publish these apps to Windows phones, phablets, small tablets, full tablets, hybrids, 2-in-1’s, netbooks, ultrabooks, notebooks, laptops, desktops and even servers. You’ll also be able to use the same apps/code when running Windows on IoT devices like the Raspberry Pi 2, and soon enough you’ll be able to publish those same apps on Xbox One! But the main question is:

Are you ready for Windows 10?

The BUILD 2015 conference starts in less than a week and you’ll be able to watch live streams of countless sessions to bring you up to speed on many development topics, from the cloud to mobile development, including IoT and game development.

You probably want to capitalize on this new wave of Windows 10 opportunities, but many of you may not be too familiar with app development for Windows devices. Fortunately there is a way for you to catch-up, and fast. And the best part is it’s completely free. It’s called Microsoft Virtual Academy.

Successful technologists never stop learning and great technology never stops evolving. Microsoft Virtual Academy (MVA) offers online Microsoft training delivered by experts to help technologists continually learn, with hundreds of Microsoft training courses, in 14 different languages. MVA’s mission is to help developers, knowledgeable IT professionals and advanced students learn the latest technology, build their skills, and advance their careers.

With hundreds of free courses in MVA, it can be quite a daunting task to get started. Which course should you take? This blog post is your learning guide, providing you with the roadmap you need to learn Universal Windows App development, and get ready for Windows 10.

I’ve outlined the recommended courses based on your current skill level. Feel free to dive in at the level that is most appropriate for you:

  • Absolute Beginners
  • Beginner / Intermediate-level App Developers (Windows Store or Windows Phone)
  • Experienced / Published Mobile App Developers on Windows

To help you get started with the tools you need, make sure to read my Ultimate Guide & FAQ to Setting-up a Windows Phone Development Environment.

ABSOLUTE BEGINNERS

Start with this section if you’re completely new to programming, or if you are completely new to app development in general.

C# Fundamentals for Absolute Beginners
Want to learn a different language? Over the course of 25 episodes, our friend Bob Tabor, from www.LearnVisualStudio.net, teaches you the fundamentals of visual C# programming. Tune in to learn C# concepts applicable to video games, mobile environments, and client applications. We walk you through getting the tools, writing code, debugging features, customizations, and much more! Each concept in this C# for beginners course is broken into its own video so you can search for and focus on the information you need.

Introduction to Mobile App Development
Nothing motivates students more than building an app that they care about and that they can immediately see, use, and share. Get insights from Windows Platform Developer MVP​ Lance McCarthy, as he teaches students to build a mobile app using Windows App Studio and to then extend and enhance the app using Visual Studio. Students learn the basics of the app ecosystem and Software Development Lifecycle. They also learn about code modification and additional basic app coding skills, including the topics of variables, simple data types, conditional programming constructs, and simple library classes. This course addresses AP Computer Science learning requirements.

Windows Phone 8.1 Development for Absolute Beginners
Join Bob Tabor (LearnVisualStudio.NET) for this 9+ hour series as he covers Windows Phone UI with XAML layout and events, navigation model, application lifecycle, and working with the Windows Phone Emulator. This course focuses on Windows Phone development for beginners as Tabor explores understanding XAML, MVVM (Model-View-ViewModel) and HTML apps in the WebView. Get details about storage, maps, animations, and media (video/audio with the MediaElement control). Build five apps, covering a range of scenarios, from media playback to hosted HTML, from accessing geolocation data and mapping to extending your Windows Phone app to become a universal Windows/Windows Phone app. These Windows Phone development tutorials will build a firm foundation for your future in mobile app development.

BEGINNER / INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL WINDOWS PHONE or WINDOWS STORE DEVELOPERS

Start with this section if you are an experienced developer but new to app development on Windows, or if you have some experience with Windows Phone and/or Windows Store development but your knowledge is spotty.

Building Apps for Windows Phone 8.1 Jump Start
If you’re an app developer who wants to design and build apps for Windows Phone 8.1 using XAML and C#, check out this two-and-a-half day, on-demand course, taught by experts with years of experience developing—and writing about the process. The sessions focus on building apps for Windows Phone 8.1 in Visual Studio and creating universal app projects that share a high percentage of code and that target both Windows and Windows Phone. Get tips and tricks on maximizing your app compatibility and optimizing your code. Find out about new features, and learn how to program the many new Windows Runtime APIs that are available to both Windows Store apps and to Windows Silverlight apps. You can even get code samples. Want to build an app? Watch this course and make your apps for Windows Phone world-ready!

Developing Universal Windows Apps with C# and XAML
Get real-world guidance for developing creating universal Windows apps, and save yourself valuable time when creating developing an apps for today’s mobile workforce and consumer marketplace. Learn from Microsoft experts as they build a working app using XAML and C# development tools and techniques that can give you a dramatic advantage as a developer when targeting both Windows and Windows Phone devices. See what’s smart to share and what’s not, when developing for the two platforms. Explore a broad range of features, covering both consumer and enterprise scenarios. Jerry Nixon and Daren May bring together best practices and key insights from Microsoft internal teams, including the built-in code-generation tools in Visual Studio that can automatically build out hundreds of classes and thousands of lines of code.

EXPERIENCED / PUBLISHED MOBILE DEVELOPERS ON WINDOWS

So you’ve published some apps already and you think you’re an expert? I bet you can still learn a thing or two. Check out these MVA courses and feel free to pick & choose the individual modules that interest you the most. In any case, make sure to watch the last MVA course listed here: A Developer’s Guide to Windows 10 Preview.

Azure Mobile Services and API Management
Want your business to compete in a mobile first, cloud first world? Microsoft Azure can help. For example, Turnkey API Management capabilities help you share APIs with partners securely, and Mobile Services help you to build enterprise-grade mobile experiences for consumers and employees alike, in record time. Get the details and helpful tips from the experts, in this practical course.

Windows 8.1 Developer Training: Geek Edition Jump Start
HTML and XAML developers, are you ready to start having fun with Windows 8.1? Join Microsoft experts for an on-demand version of the highly successful dive deep into the gadget and devices side of Windows 8.1. Explore 3D printing, the LEGO EV3 platform (and how to use it from Bluetooth and USB), how to get speech out of your modern app, and more. See some exciting demos, and find out about awesome new features in both HTML and XAML. Build on your core skills, take advantage of everything Windows 8.1 has to offer, and dive into the Internet of Things (IoT).

While the whole course is definitely interesting, allow me to call out these specific modules to round-out your Windows app development knowledge:

  • Module 4 – Speech, Camera and Microphone
  • Module 7 – Bluetooth Overview
  • Module 10 – Performance

Universal Windows App Development with Cortana and the Speech SDK
Want to add Cortana to your app? Whether you’re into speech integration technology for accessibility, social responsibility, or gaming (or all of the above!), you’re probably excited about the possibilities that Cortana offers for Windows Phone developers today and Windows 10 app developers in the near future. Mobility pioneer Nick Landry and popular author/teacher Jeremy Foster share their practical experience in computer speech technologies and mobile app development scenarios. Explore the why and how of speech apps, tour Cortana, and review the capabilities of the Speech SDK in Windows and Windows Phone. Work with speech synthesis, look at integrating Cortana into your app, check out voice commands, and find out how to build speech-enabled mobile apps with Visual Studio for Windows devices. You’d be surprised at what you can do with as little as three lines of code!

A Developer’s Guide to Windows 10
Want an in-depth look at the Universal Windows Platform? Engaging experts Jerry Nixon and Andy Wigley return to show you how Windows capabilities and social integration can help you create amazing experiences on devices running Windows 10, including phones, tablets, PCs, and even (coming soon) Xbox! Jerry and Andy host three demo-rich days of Windows 10 goodness, explore cool new features, and offer practical guidance. Each session lasts about 30 minutes, so you can join us for the topics that interest you most.

Are you already one of 3 million students who cannot get enough of Microsoft Virtual Academy? What are your favorite courses? Who are your favorite instructors? Are there other courses you would like to recommend to your fellow students in addition to this list? Make sure to let me know in the comments below, or contact me on Twitter at @ActiveNick.

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AzureChatr: Building a Cross-Platform Chat App for Windows, iOS & Android

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by Nick Landry (last updated on 10/7/2014)

Have you ever witnessed a big news announcement about some mobile app or website being acquired for millions (or billions!) of dollars, only to tell yourself:

Wow, that’s a lot of money, and to think that I could have been the one to build that!

This is exactly how I felt when WhatsApp was purchased by Facebook for a whopping 19 BILLION dollars earlier this year. Why? Because like all of you, I have technical skills and I know how to build apps, and I knew I could have built that app. It seems that chat/messaging apps are all the craze now. Microsoft got things going early when Skype was acquired back in 2011 (though Skype is so much more than just a chat app). Yahoo just acquired MessageMe, and now Google is apparently building their own too. So what am I to do here? Admit that it’s too late or challenge myself?

I decided I would prove it to myself. I decided to build a cross-platform chat app that lets people on Windows, iOS and Android chat with each other. I knew it wouldn’t be that hard because I have a (not so) secret weapon called Microsoft Azure. My goal is ultimately to show everyone how easy it can be to build cloud-powered mobile apps, no matter if you are a Windows, iOS or Android developer using C#, Objective-C or Java. What better way to do this than to build a live app, and then share the source code with the community as I blog about the internal “how to’s”?

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Introducing AzureChatr: A Chat App Powered by the Cloud

AzureChatr (pronounced “Azure Chatter”) is a cross-platform chat client that I now use to demonstrate mobile development techniques with a cloud backend using Microsoft Azure. While AzureChatr can be used to chat about anything, the intent of the app is to bring users together to talk about cloud development. Last June I shipped the initial beta release of AzureChatr for Windows Phone 8.1. AzureChatr will soon be available on Windows 8.1, iOS and Android too. The cool thing is you do not have to wait until I publish AzureChatr on the other platforms. You can find the source code for Windows, iOS and Android below.

AzureChatr lets you chat live in real-time with other users in a global chat room. You do not need to invite anyone, it’s just a big central meeting place (for now). There is currently no support for private chat and all conversations should be considered public

PRIVACY NOTICE: All chat conversations are saved in the cloud for history purposes. Chat conversations should be considered public but will not be distributed to any third parties or used for any other purposes than displaying conversations in the app. Do not divulge any private or confidential information in AzureChatr.

AzureChatr Features

The current version of AzureChatr is certainly not as full-featured as WhatsApp or other popular chatting apps. My goal is to keep adding features over time and document their implementation at the same time here on my blog.

Common Features: Windows, iOS, Android

  • All chats are posted in a global public chat room. There is no private chat yet.
  • Send chat lines to the cloud and save them in Azure Mobile Services.
  • Receive chat lines from the cloud via push notifications (i.e. WNS, APNS, GCM).
  • Display new chat conversation items as toast notification / popup alerts when the app is not running. Tapping the toast / alert launches the app.
  • Integration with the Action Center / Notification Centers on Windows Phone, iOS and Android.
  • Support for Portrait or Landscape orientation.

It should be noted that there is currently no built-in way to mute or disable the notifications. This is obviously an upcoming feature. The only way to mute the notifications is either to disable them in your phone settings where allowed, or uninstall the app.

Extra Features in the Universal Windows version

Since the Windows Phone 8.1 version is already live in the store, there are additional features I’ve already added to polish the app a bit more for public use. Though the Windows version is not live yet, some features have already been integrated should you play with the source code yourself. This is because the Windows and Windows Phone versions are built as a Universal Windows app that virtually shares 100% of its source code. The extra features already available in this version are:

  • Integrated login with default Microsoft Account on the device.
  • AutoScroll the chat window down after each new chat entry is posted.
  • Multiline text entries with wrapping.
  • Only retrieve the last 20 entries on app startup / refresh.
  • Added an extra Send button when using the Windows version since the default send button in the app bar is not visible by default.
  • Send chat line on ENTER key in Windows for mouse & keyboard users.

Upcoming Features

Other than bringing the iOS and Android to parity with the Windows version, I already have a long shopping list of features that I plan to eventually add to AzureChatr across all versions.

  • Display time stamps on individual chat items.
  • Support for additional chat rooms by topic, and private chat rooms where you can invite your friends.
  • Access the chat log history by scrolling back.
  • Speech synthesis integration to hear what your friends are saying without looking at the app.
  • Voice command activation with Cortana (on Windows Phone).
  • Display user profile images and allow users to provide additional profile data in the app.
  • Customize the UI such as font sizes, colors, etc.
  • Support for hyperlinks and emojis in chat.
  • Support for posting images in chat.
  • Muting notifications when you don’t want to be disturbed.
  • Authentication via Twitter, Facebook and Google+.
  • Allow users to “Like” someone else’s post.

And this is just a partial list. I have a lot more in my backlog. Feel free to post your own suggestions in the comments section below. Note that AzureChatr is not something I’m working on full-time. I’ll bang out some code and keep adding features when I find time, but do not expect this to because the be-all-end-all of all chat apps anytime soon.

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Download the AzureChatr App

Wanna try the app? So far I have only published the Windows Phone 8.1 version of AzureChatr. The others will come soon enough.

  • Download AzureChatr for Windows Phone 8.1 (Note that this is currently a BETA release only available to a few countries: USA, Canada, UK, Ireland, Australia, India and Finland).
  • Download AzureChatr for Windows 8.1 (coming soon)
  • Download AzureChatr for iPhone & iPad (coming soon)
  • Download AzureChatr for Android tablets & phones (coming soon)

I’ll be sure to update this blog post as the other versions become available, and also when I add additional features to the app. Of course, the whole goal here is to learn how to build this yourself or how to add similar features to your own apps, so keep on reading to discover what goes on under the hood.

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AzureChatr: Under the Hood

AzureChatr has a lot of moving parts and this section will host links to several blog posts that dissect specific aspects of the AzureChatr components, including the following:

  • AzureChatr client for Windows and Windows Phone
  • AzureChatr client for Android
  • AzureChatr client for iOS
  • Cloud components, including Azure Mobile Services, Authentication Services and Notification Hubs

You can get started by watching this video interview about AzureChatr from the Visual Studio Toolbox show on Channel 9. It features the show host – Robert Green – and myself geeking out over how AzureChatr was built, what it does, and how Azure powers it all.

Bookmark this page and stay tuned as blog more about AzureChatr. All the links will be added here.

Dive Into the Source Code & the Azure Services

Before you download the source code for any of the AzureChatr versions, you have to create a Microsoft Azure account and configure the appropriate Azure services for table storage via Mobile Services, authentication via Microsoft Account, and push notifications via Notification Hubs.

The following links will help guide you through this process, including several tutorials from the Azure documentation.

Obtaining a Microsoft Azure Account

Setting-up the Required Azure Components

  • Create a new Mobile Service for your version of AzureChatr. You can use the tutorial here to learn how to get started but all you need is to create the mobile service by picking a name, selecting/creating a SQL database, picking a region affinity, and selecting the desired backend (JavaScript/Node or .NET). My version of AzureChatr uses JavaScript so if you want to use the same server-side code that I am sharing with you, you should pick JavaScript. Note that you do not have to repeat this step for the 3 clients. There is only one Mobile Service commonly used by the Windows, iOS and Android clients.
  • Follow the same tutorial to create a new table called ChatItem.
  • Authenticate your Windows app with Live Connect single sign-on: Follow the steps in this tutorial to register your app for the Windows Store, restrict permissions to authenticated users and install the Live SDK for Windows. Note that in the current implementation of the code, the iOS and Android versions do not yet support authentication. The authentication code has already been added to the Universal Windows app.
  • Please refer to the README.MD file in GitHub. There is a version for each of the 3 client versions. It contains a block of code you need to edit the ChatItem table Insert script.

Source Code Links in GitHub

The source code for all three versions of AzureChatr is available in my GitHub repo under the following links:

  • Source code: Windows Clients for a Cloud-based Cross-Platform Chat App for Windows Phone and Windows Tablets, Laptops and Desktops. Written in C# as a native Universal app using Visual Studio.
  • Source code: Android Client for a Cloud-based Cross-Platform Chat App for Smartphones and Tablets. Written in Java as a native app using Eclipse. This is just a basic prototype for now and is not ready for publication to the Google Play Store.

    Source code: iOS Client for a Cloud-based Cross-Platform Chat App for iPhone and iPad. Written in Objective-C as a native app using Xcode. This is just a basic prototype for now and is not ready for publication to the Apple App Store.

You’re probably wondering why I chose the “silo approach” to build these 3 versions. After all, building the 3 versions with 3 different languages, 3 different SDKs and 3 different IDEs is basically the hardest way possible. Personally I would have preferred to use Xamarin to build a cross-platform app and share as much code as possible. But I felt it was important to stick with the native tools already known by the developers indigenous to each mobile ecosystem.

Feel free to use the source code in your own apps. This is why I’m posting my source here, I want you all to learn how to use Azure for such online apps. You can use it to add chat capabilities to other domain-specific apps, or even to your own games. If you intend to simply create another “competing chat client”, that is fine too. All I ask is that you extend the code with your own ideas and features – make it your own (not just a clone) – and publish your chat apps under a different name of your own choosing (i.e. NOT AzureChatr).

If you have questions about AzureChatr, any of the mobile versions discussed here, the features, source code, design decisions or if you need help standing-up your own Azure services to support your own chat features, you can post them in the comments below, or you can ping me on Twitter at @ActiveNick.

Ultimate Guide & FAQ to Setting-Up a Windows Phone Development Environment

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by Nick Landry (last updated on 9/22/2014)

Mobile development is full of exciting opportunities, but setting-up your development environment can sometimes be a challenge depending on what your current hardware is, and what mobile platform you want to target. I work with a lot of developers at hackathons, workshops and meetups, and helping developers get started with Windows Phone development is a part of my day to day.

The goal of this post is to be a one-stop shop for any developers getting started with Windows Phone development to help them prepare their development environment using either free tools or using their current Visual Studio setup. For most developers using a recent Windows computer, installing the Windows Phone developer tools will be a breeze accomplished through a one-step process. But for other developers using legacy hardware, a lot of questions arise as to whether or not their current machine is up to snuff to run the Windows Phone SDK. I’ll try to address most of these questions I’ve been getting over the last couple of years. If there are important questions I am missing, feel free to ask them in the comments below and I will do my best to amend them in this post.

How much are the Windows Phone Dev Tools?

Totally free! You can install a single package called Visual Studio Express 2013 with Update 3 for Windows completely for free and you will get the following all at once:

  • Visual Studio 2013, the premier Integrated Development Environment (IDE)
  • Windows Phone 8.1 SDK (to build apps for Windows smartphones)
  • Windows 8.1 SDK (to build Windows Store apps for Windows tablets, laptops, hybrids & desktops)

To learn more about developing apps by using Visual Studio 2013, refer to the official documentation here.

I want to install the Windows Phone dev tools now. Where is the link?

Download the Windows Phone tools here. Remember to choose Visual Studio Express 2013 with Update 3 for Windows (NOT the version “for Windows Desktop”). Check out the requirements below first to make sure you have all you need.

What do I need for Windows Phone development?

The following lists the requirements to install the Windows Phone SDK:

  • Operating System: Windows 8.1 (x64). To run the Windows Phone Emulator, you’ll need Windows 8.1 Pro.
  • Processor: 1.6 GHz or faster
  • Memory: Your machine should really have no less than 4GB of RAM, and I definitely would recommend 8GB or more if your machine allows it
  • Storage: 11 GB of available hard disk space on a 5400 RPM hard drive. I highly recommend getting a fast hard drive (10K RPM) or a Solid State Drive (SSD)
  • Video: DirectX 9-capable video card running at 1024 x 768 or higher display resolution

There is one exception to the 64-bit rule. You can use a Windows 8.1 32-bit (x86) development machine to build Windows Phone 81. (but not 8.0) apps if you do not intend to use the emulator and debug your apps exclusively using an external Windows Phone device connected over USB.

To learn more about the requirements for Windows Phone 8 development, refer to the official documentation here.

What about Windows Store apps for tablets, Surface & desktop?

That’s an easy one. All the instructions provided in this blog post automatically give you the dev tools you need to build Windows Store and Universal apps. Universal apps let you share over 90% of your code when building apps for the phone, tablets, hybrids, 2-in-1’s, notebooks, laptops and desktops (and Xbox too in the near future). Note that I am spending extra time in this blog post on the Windows Phone side of things due to the extra requirements of the Windows Phone emulator.

Why is Windows 8.1 required?

Simple, because the core operating system for Windows Phone 8.x is the same: it’s Windows 8. Whether you’re building an app for Windows Phone, for the Windows Store, or the new Universal Windows app model, the underlying runtime is WinRT (not .NET), and WinRT was introduced with Windows 8. The Windows Runtime is part of a reimagining of the developer experience for Windows. It’s the modern Windows API surface used to create new Windows Store apps on Windows 8.x.

Why is Windows 8.1 Pro required for the Windows Phone Emulator?

Windows 8.1 (x64) Professional edition or higher is required for the Windows Phone emulators since those emulators are actually Hyper-V Virtual Machines (VM) running the Windows Phone operating system. Hyper-V is a feature of Windows 8.1 Pro. From a hardware point of view, you’ll need a processor that supports Client Hyper-V and Second Level Address Translation (SLAT). If your computer is running on an Intel Core i3, i5 or i7 CPU, you should be fine as those will typically support SLAT.

Hyper-V enables fast hardware virtualization to accelerate virtual machines and provide maximum performance. If you want to see how slow an emulator can get without hardware virtualization, go try the emulators in Google’s Android SDK.

Note that while you may have Windows 8.1 Pro, it does not necessarily guarantee that Hyper-V will be installed. To be sure, follow these steps:

  1. In Control Panel, click Programs, and then click Turn Windows features on or off.

  2. In the Windows Features dialog box, click Hyper-V. The list of options expands.

  3. In the expanded list of options, select at least the Hyper-V Platform check box, and then click OK.

HyperV-Feature

For more information about the Windows Features dialog box, see Turn Windows Features On or Off.

To learn more about how to enable Hyper-V for the emulator for Windows Phone, refer to the official WP8 documentation here.

What is SLAT? How do I know if my computer supports SLAT?

As discussed above, the Windows Phone emulator requires Hyper-V, which in turns requires a processor that supports Client Hyper-V and Second Level Address Translation (SLAT). PCs that support SLAT are Intel-based processors that start with i (e.g., i3, i5, i7, i9) or any CPUs based on Nehalem, Westmere, Sandybridge, Ivy Bridge & Haswell micro-architectures. The AMD equivalents are supported too.

To determine if your machine supports SLAT, perform the following steps:

CoreInfoSLAT

  • If you have a hyphen/dash (“-”) next to EPT, then you should start looking for a new computer. I hear the Surface Pro 3 is really nice Smile. You’re not entirely out of luck though, you can still use the tools to build Windows Phone apps, but you’ll have to use an external Windows Phone device to run & debug your apps. More on that below.

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There are also scenarios where the hypervisor is not turned on by default and you have to enable it in your computer BIOS. If you’re running Windows in Bootcamp on a Mac, there are no BIOS settings you can edit. The only way to force the a Mac to turn on the hypervisor is to cold-boot into Mac OS X, and then perform a warm reboot/OS switch to Windows.

To learn more about how to enable BIOS settings and Hyper-V for the emulator for Windows Phone, refer to the official WP8 documentation here.

I don’t have Windows 8. Can I use Windows 7 instead?

No. Windows 8.1 is required for the reasons explained above. You can still use Visual Studio 2010 and Windows 7 to build Windows Phone 7.x with the Windows Phone 7.1 SDK. You’ll unfortunately miss out on a lot of the great features introduced in Windows Phone 8 in 2012, and Windows Phone 8.1 in 2014. These great features include In-App Purchasing, Background Tasks, Cortana & the Speech SDK, a new map control & geofencing, support for more screen resolutions, and hundreds of other essential features that Windows Phone users are now taking for granted.

A question I often get is “Why isn’t Microsoft releasing additional updates for Windows 7 to get the Windows App Store and all the bits required for Windows Store & phone development?” There is an easy answer to that. We already did: it’s called upgrading to Windows 8! Seriously, Windows 8 builds on Windows 7. Everything that was in Windows 7 is in Windows 8.x.

What do I install if I already have Visual Studio 2013?

If you already use Visual Studio 2013 Professional Edition or higher, you simply need to install Update 2 or higher to get support for Windows Phone 8.1 and Universal Windows app development. At the time of this writing, Update 3 for Visual Studio 2013 is already available, so you might as well install the latest update:

  • Launch Visual Studio 2013
  • In the Tools menu, select Extensions and Updates
  • Expand the Updates branch in the tree of options on the left
  • Select Product Updates
  • Select Visual Studio 2013 Update 3 in the list of available updates and launch the installation

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Alternatively, you can download and install the latest update package for Visual Studio 2013 here.

Can I still build Windows Phone 8 apps using the WP8.1 tools?

Yes! You can use Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 and above to build the following types of Windows Phone projects:

  • Windows Phone 8.1 apps (i.e. WinRT)
  • Universal Windows apps for Windows Phone 8.1 and Windows 8.1 (also WinRT)
  • Windows Phone Silverlight 8.0 (i.e. WP apps based on the classic .NET architecture introduced with Windows Phone 7.x)
  • Windows Phone Silverlight 8.1 (i.e. same as above, but with access to the new 8.1 APIs too)

Can I use Visual Studio 2010 or 2012 instead?

If you want to build Windows Phone 8.1 apps or Universal Windows apps, you’ll need Visual Studio 2013 Update 2 or above. You can install the Windows Phone 8 SDK on Visual Studio 2012 to build WP8 or WP7.x apps, and you can install the Windows Phone 7.1 SDK on Visual Studio 2010 to build Windows Phone 7.x apps.

The table below summarizes the various SDKs, Visual Studio versions, app targets supported and required development operating systems.

WPSDK-Compatibility-Chart

I use a Mac. Can I still do Windows Phone development?

Not out of the box, but there are ways to achieve this. Since I’m a cross-platform mobile developer, I use a MacBook Pro for a lot of my development work. You’ll essentially need to install Windows 8.1 on your Mac, and there are two main ways you can achieve this:

  1. Use the Boot Camp Assistant on your Mac to setup a secondary operating system partition on your Mac, and then install Windows 8.1 on that new partition. Boot Camp basically lets you create a dual-boot machine.
  2. The alternative is to use virtualization software like Parallels Desktop for Mac or VMware Fusion to setup Windows 8.1 as a virtual machine (VM) on your Mac. You’ll have to enable something called “Nested Virtualization” to run the Windows Phone emulator, which is itself a VM that therefore needs to run within another VM.
  3. The third option is actually a combination of the first two, and the one I use on my Mac. First, setup Boot Camp on your Mac, and then install Parallels or VMWare. The difference is that when you create your Windows VM, don’t create a new Virtual Hard Drive (VHD) and instead virtualize your Bootcamp partition. This gives you the ability to choose how you run Windows: natively (aka “on the metal”) using Bootcamp, or virtualized when co-habitation is required (e.g. for Xamarin development).

To learn more about Boot Camp, visit Apple’s Support site here.

I don’t have a Windows Phone. Is there an emulator?

Yes, all Windows Phone SDKs ship with their corresponding emulators. As discussed above, the Windows Phone emulator is a full image of the Windows Phone operating system running in a Hyper-V virtual machine. This level of emulation provides full fidelity for testing your apps when compared to a physical device, as opposed to device simulators (e.g. Apple’s iOS Simulator) which provide very little in terms of advanced compatibility with physical devices.

Read more about the Windows Phone 8 emulator here. The Windows Phone 8.1 emulator supports the same capabilities and more. You can download additional images for the emulator here.

How can I use my own Windows Phone to debug apps?

Windows Phone development can be done with entirely free tools. However, to use your own phone for app testing & debugging, you’ll have to register as a Windows Developer on the Windows DevCenter.

  • You do not need a Windows Phone Developer account to download the SDK and start developing apps
  • You do need a developer account to unlock a phone for development and to submit apps for testing and publication in the Windows Phone Store (formerly known as Windows Phone Marketplace)

To get a Developer Account:

Note that the registration now includes both the Windows Store and Windows Phone Developer registration in the same account! The $19 charge used to be a yearly fee but Microsoft recently announced that it is now a lifetime subscription, effectively making Windows Phone the cheapest modern device app store you can publish to.

To learn more about developer licenses for store apps (i.e. Windows & Windows Phone), refer to the official documentation here.

Once you are registered as a Windows developer, follow these steps to register your Windows Phone device for development.

How can I get a cheap Windows Phone for development?

I’m glad you asked. The Windows Phone ecosystem has a wide range of devices for all budgets. We have flagship devices like the Lumia 1520 or the Lumia ICON (aka Lumia 930 worldwide). We also have very affordable yet full-featured phones that you can buy off-contract (i.e. without any carrier subsidized discount or two-year contract) for less than $100 USD. Here are some options:

Note that these phones either ship out of the box with the latest Windows Phone 8.1 software, or with Windows Phone 8. All these phones are upgradeable to Windows Phone 8.1 with all the new features like Cortana, Action Center, Universal Apps, folders, geofencing, triggered tasks, and so on.

Next Steps: Learning Resources

Congratulations! You should now have a working development environment to built Windows Phone apps and Universal Windows apps. In terms of resources to get started, my whole blog is dedicated to helping mobile developers across the board, but if you’re looking for a short list of resources to jumpstart your learning, start digging in the following:

If you have any questions or issues regarding your setup, feel free to ask me questions in the comments section below, or you can ping me on Twitter at @ActiveNick. if there are common questions or issues that I have not addressed here, feel free to let me know what those are and I’ll append them to this post.

Good luck with your apps, and make sure to let me know when you publish new apps in the store. I always love promoting the work of our community.

Event Session – Building Universal Windows Apps for Smartphones and Tablets with XAML & C#

Universal-Apps-Devices

by Nick Landry

The “Blue Wave” is in full swing. Thanks to the new Universal Windows app templates in Visual Studio 2013 Update 2, it is now easier than ever to build mobile apps for both Windows Store and Windows Phone. Developers are curious about the new features and I’ve been touring around speaking at events to spread the word about Universal Windows apps.

I recently presented this talk at Philly Code Camp 2014 last weekend, at the Microsoft Mobile App Devs of New Jersey (MMAD) Meetup and NYC .NET Developers Group.

Session Description

This session is your fast track into the wonderful new world of app development for Windows device. Come learn how your valuable C# skills now make you a hot mobile developer for smartphones, tablets, laptops and desktops. We’ll perform a quick lap around Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 and the new Windows Universal Apps, build our first app using XAML & C#, and debug it with Windows 8.1 and the Windows Phone Emulator. We’ll then explore the converged WinRT API services and features, such as touch input, accelerometers, Live Tiles, etc. We’ll also spend valuable time going over the new app model for Windows device apps, how to share code between phone and tablet, and how to build a converged UI in XAML for Windows 8.1 and Windows Phone. Lastly we’ll go over the app packaging and how to submit your Universal apps to the Windows Store. The converged Windows Platform is more efficient and far-reaching than ever. Come learn how to build mobile apps for hundreds of millions of Windows device users.

Session Slides

You can view & download the slides for this talk from my Slideshare account here, or you can use the embedded viewer below.

Session Demos

You can download the demos and samples for this session using the links below:

Session Links and Resources

If you have questions about this session, you can ask them in the comments section below or contact me on Twitter at @ActiveNick. If you’re interested in inviting me to present this talk at your event or meetup, you can reach me via my contact form here.

PresentingUniversalApps

Event Session – Beyond Cortana & Siri: Using Speech Recognition & Speech Synthesis for the Next Generation of Mobile Apps

Cortana Halo 4 HD

by Nick Landry

Speech is probably the topic I’m most passionate about when it comes to app development (ok, I have a soft spot for GIS too). From HAL9000 in 2001: A Space Odyssey and Joshua in WarGames, to Star Trek computers, Siri and Cortana, having conversations with a semi-sentient computer using natural language and speech is probably the ultimate frontier of technology. But speech can also be a responsibility for us developers to make sure our apps are usable by all, and to keep our users – and those around them – safe. This talk is one of my favorite. It’s about using Speech Recognition & Speech Synthesis to build the next generation of mobile apps.

I recently presented this talk at Philly Code Camp 2014 last weekend, and at the Microsoft Mobile App Devs of New Jersey (MMAD) Meetup. I’ve also presented it at Internet Week NY 2014 last month, and I’ve done variations of this talk at other events in the past including VSLive, CodePalousa, DevTeach, DVLUP Day Boston and M3 Conference.

Session Description

Our society has a problem. Individuals are hooked on apps, phones, tablets and social networking. We created these devices and these apps that have become a core part of our lives but we stopped short. We failed to recognize some of the problematic situations where our apps are used. People are texting, emailing and chatting while driving. Pedestrians walk into busy intersections and into sidewalk hazards because they refuse to put their phone down. We cannot entirely blame them. We created a mobile revolution, and now we just can’t simply ask them to put it on hold when it’s not convenient. It’s almost an addiction and too often it has led to fatal results.

Furthermore, mobile applications are not always easy to work with due to the small screen and on-screen keyboard. Other people struggle to use traditional computing devices due to handicaps. Using our voice is a natural form of communication amongst humans. Ever since 2001: A Space Odyssey, we’ve been dreaming of computers who can converse with us like HAL9000 or the Star Trek computers. Or maybe you’re part of the new generation of geeks dreaming of Halo’s Cortana? Thanks to the new advances and SDKs for speech recognition and synthesis (aka text-to-speech), we are now several steps closer to this reality. Siri is not the end game, she’s the beginning.

This session explores the design models and development techniques you can use to add voice recognition to your mobile applications, including in-app commands, standard & custom grammars, and voice commands usable outside your app. We’ll also see how your apps can respond to the user via speech synthesis, opening-up a new world of hands-free scenarios. This reality is here, you’ll see actual live cross-platform demos with speech and you can now learn how to do it. Speech support is not just cool or a convenience, it should be a necessity in many apps.

Session Slides

You can view & download the slides for this talk from my Slideshare account here, or you can use the embedded viewer below.

Session Demos

You can download the demos and samples for this session using the links below:

Session Links and Resources

If you have questions about this session, you can ask them in the comments section below or contact me on Twitter at @ActiveNick. If you’re interested in inviting me to present this talk at your event or meetup, you can reach me via my contact form here.

Nick-SpeechSDK-Talk