Tag Archives: Mobile Development

Your Employer Owns Your Job, but YOU Own Your Career: Why Mobile Dev Matters

MobilityGrowthBanner

Have you ever built and published a mobile app? Maybe you’ve tried and abandoned the idea because you didn’t make any money. Maybe you gave up before even trying because it’s a saturated market and making money is hard. Forget the app money, mobile development can be your path to a better career, and yes, that will bring you more money too.

In this video I walk you through the list of skills you will build by becoming a mobile developer. These skills will improve your technical profile as a developer, and at the same time increase your value with employers. Even if your apps make no money, you will get a clear benefit out of them by improving your technical profile, and therefore increase your value as a developer.

Don’t wait for your employer to assign you to a better project, take control of your career and get started now. Head over to Microsoft Virtual Academy to learn mobile development. Build mobile apps, build your skills, build your resume, go get more money, and go get the job of your dreams.

Watch the video on Channel 9 or using the embedded player below:

If you have questions on how to get started or want to discuss this topic, you can find me on Twitter at @ActiveNick. Be sure to let me know once you publish some apps, I’d love to check them out and help you promote them.

Other Learning Resources

Event Session – Beyond Cortana & Siri: Using Speech Recognition & Speech Synthesis for the Next Generation of Mobile Apps

Cortana Halo 4 HD

by Nick Landry

Speech is probably the topic I’m most passionate about when it comes to app development (ok, I have a soft spot for GIS too). From HAL9000 in 2001: A Space Odyssey and Joshua in WarGames, to Star Trek computers, Siri and Cortana, having conversations with a semi-sentient computer using natural language and speech is probably the ultimate frontier of technology. But speech can also be a responsibility for us developers to make sure our apps are usable by all, and to keep our users – and those around them – safe. This talk is one of my favorite. It’s about using Speech Recognition & Speech Synthesis to build the next generation of mobile apps.

I recently presented this talk at Philly Code Camp 2014 last weekend, and at the Microsoft Mobile App Devs of New Jersey (MMAD) Meetup. I’ve also presented it at Internet Week NY 2014 last month, and I’ve done variations of this talk at other events in the past including VSLive, CodePalousa, DevTeach, DVLUP Day Boston and M3 Conference.

Session Description

Our society has a problem. Individuals are hooked on apps, phones, tablets and social networking. We created these devices and these apps that have become a core part of our lives but we stopped short. We failed to recognize some of the problematic situations where our apps are used. People are texting, emailing and chatting while driving. Pedestrians walk into busy intersections and into sidewalk hazards because they refuse to put their phone down. We cannot entirely blame them. We created a mobile revolution, and now we just can’t simply ask them to put it on hold when it’s not convenient. It’s almost an addiction and too often it has led to fatal results.

Furthermore, mobile applications are not always easy to work with due to the small screen and on-screen keyboard. Other people struggle to use traditional computing devices due to handicaps. Using our voice is a natural form of communication amongst humans. Ever since 2001: A Space Odyssey, we’ve been dreaming of computers who can converse with us like HAL9000 or the Star Trek computers. Or maybe you’re part of the new generation of geeks dreaming of Halo’s Cortana? Thanks to the new advances and SDKs for speech recognition and synthesis (aka text-to-speech), we are now several steps closer to this reality. Siri is not the end game, she’s the beginning.

This session explores the design models and development techniques you can use to add voice recognition to your mobile applications, including in-app commands, standard & custom grammars, and voice commands usable outside your app. We’ll also see how your apps can respond to the user via speech synthesis, opening-up a new world of hands-free scenarios. This reality is here, you’ll see actual live cross-platform demos with speech and you can now learn how to do it. Speech support is not just cool or a convenience, it should be a necessity in many apps.

Session Slides

You can view & download the slides for this talk from my Slideshare account here, or you can use the embedded viewer below.

Session Demos

You can download the demos and samples for this session using the links below:

Session Links and Resources

If you have questions about this session, you can ask them in the comments section below or contact me on Twitter at @ActiveNick. If you’re interested in inviting me to present this talk at your event or meetup, you can reach me via my contact form here.

Nick-SpeechSDK-Talk

Live from New York, it’s the Internet of Things!

IoTExpo Galileo Banner

by Nick Landry

I’ve been spending the last couple of days at SYS-CON’s Cloud Expo in New York City – which also includes the Internet of Things Expo (amongst others). It’s been fun so far to connect with attendees at the Microsoft booth and discuss all the goodness that is in Microsoft Azure, and I’ll be back there for another day tomorrow. Yesterday I had the pleasure of meeting Kevin Benedict from Cognizant and MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com. We sat down for a short interview to discuss the Internet of Things, how Microsoft plays in that space, where things have been, where things are going, and also discuss some cool scenarios. The possibilities are truly endless.

You can watch the interview right here below. I’ve also included various links to some of the topics discussed at the bottom of this post.

Links from the Interview

What does the Internet of Things mean to you? Are you a maker? What cool ideas do you have for connecting “things” with devices, computers and the cloud? Let me know in the comments below or on Twitter at @ActiveNick.

(re)Introducing Windows Platform Developer Magazine

WPDEV Magazine Cover 2014-6-6-1280

Almost a year ago, I decided to test the waters on a new feature of my (then) favorite iPad app: Flipboard. Flipboard is still one of my favorite apps on the iPad, and I also use it on Android and Windows 8. Flipboard was basically my favorite way to read all the articles gathered under my own Google Reader, with everything neatly organized like a magazine layout. Flipboard has evolved beyond its RSS roots, especially given the closure of Google Reader. I now use Feedly instead, but Flipboard doesn’t integrate with it. You can still add individual RSS feeds to Flipboard however.

Flipboard also offered article feeds from well known news sources, and later introduced a feature to curate your own magazines, and then share them with the world. Not only limited to mobile devices (especially tablets), Flipboard announced last year that Flipboard Magazines could now be enjoyed on the web.

I decided to experiment with the idea and launched my first Flipboard magazine: Windows Phone Developer – featuring news,  tips, and techniques for mobile developers passionate about Windows Phone. The launch “issue” included 66 articles from the past month, covering Windows Phone both the end user and the developer point of view. The months went buy, the magaine grew with more articles and more readers and I can honestly say that so far this has been a successful experiment:

  • Over 300 articles!
  • Over 48,000 readers!!
  • Over 1 million page flips!!!

WPDEV Magazine First 6 Covers-1280

Today I am re-branding and re-launching my Flipboard magazine for a new world of Universal Windows apps for phones, tablets, laptops, desktops & other Windows devices. Introducing:

Windows Platform Developer Magazine! Access it here at http://aka.ms/wpdevmag

The articles in Windows Platform Developer Magazine are curated from various sources, including official Microsoft blogs, DVLUP, Conversations on Nokia, Windows Phone Central, and other sources including blogs from MVPs, community experts and such. If you feel there is another source of articles I should be drawing from, feel free to let me know in the comments below. I also individually select and curate each article that goes in. I do not use scripts to populate the magazine from RSS feeds. As such, the appearance of new articles is not always regular, and I promise to stay on top of things to keep the content fresh.

So go try it out. Download the Flipboard app on Windows 8, iOS or Android, and subscribe to Windows Platform Developer Magazine at http://aka.ms/wpdevmag. You can also use the link to flip through in a web browser.

What do you think? Do you like the magazine? I will be announcing a couple more magazines soon. Are there more topics you’d like me to cover in other magazines? Let me know in the comments below or on Twitter at @ActiveNick.

WPDEV Magazine Sampe Pages 01